Tag Archives: hand-knit

Knitting again!

You know that I must be sick when I don’t want to knit. After several bad months, I have improved enough that I’m knitting again–and it’s good! My first project was this hat, whipped up in two days. Now I’m making several items for Christmas gifts.

img_5153

Advertisements

Darling Doll

IMG_5129 (2)“Darling Doll” is the name of this pattern for a knitted doll. If she could stand, she’d be 17 inches tall. She will soon be “adopted” by a little girl whose grandmother chose the colors for her hair and jumper.

Fingerless gloves

IMG_4947

Fingerless gloves are just the thing for girls and women who like to text. I’ve made two pairs recently. The red ones are my original design and are slightly smaller for a person with short fingers, like me. The teal pair will fit someone with longer fingers.

These two pairs will be on display at our subdivision’s arts and crafts fair in March.

Infinity scarf

IMG_4697
This infinity scarf is a special order for a customer who wanted this color to match her coat.

Because the scarf pattern has right and wrong sides, I did not twist it when connecting the ends. Instead of sewing the ends together, I crocheted them. You can see the neat ridge of single crochet on the wrong side, but the joint is invisible on the right side. This was an improvement over sewing the seam.

Special order completed

IMG_4666
I’m ready to deliver the special order from the bazaar several weeks ago for a pair of men’s fingerless gloves. I used a basic glove pattern and determined where to stop the fingers by trying them on my husband’s hands. The dark brown yarn should be practical.

It’s pumpkin time!

IMG_4610

What suggests fall better than pumpkins?

The pumpkin dish cloth (left) is made from cotton yarn. Click on the image for a closer look.

The smaller pumpkin, made from a pattern, was an experiment with wool yarn. Because of the many increases to give it the round shape, the pumpkin is slightly three-dimensional, even after blocking. I like it that way and hung it on a wall as a seasonal decoration.

What to do . . . ?

IMG_4377

What do you do with two yarns that look good together, but there’s not enough of either one for a sweater? I solved my problem with this jacket and added decorative clasps for good measure.

Confession time

It’s time for me to ‘fess up and say that I’m the lady who has cancer. Since posting photos of the three cancer caps, I have had 12 weeks of chemotherapy and will soon start radiation.

I asked two cancer doctors whether I’d lose my hair, and both said “yes,” not “maybe.” But I still have much of my hair–too much to shave off! So, I haven’t worn the cancer caps or any of my nice scarves.

I spent my summer going to doctors, having treatments, and knitting. I made an apricot-colored sweater with some old wool yarn; I’ll wear it around the house this winter. I made six “Texas” dish cloths for friends and neighbors who helped me after my surgery, items for my two charity projects, and other miscellaneous things. This was truly therapy knitting.

This photo shows the items for one of my charity projects. These 14 caps, mostly made with small amounts of leftover yarn, will be Christmas gifts for the residents of subsidized housing: ten men and four women. They have rather low-paying jobs and can’t afford cars, so they must walk to and from the bus stop and the places where they work. I wanted to brighten their lives a little and help them to stay warm this winter.

IMG_3844

Another cancer cap

IMG_3743
The lady with cancer needed a cap to go with her blue jeans, so here it is. With her three caps, she should have one to go with every outfit.

Cancer caps

IMG_3732IMG_3733
These caps are for a lady who thinks that a wig would be too hot in the summer.
The pink flower is crocheted and sewn to the cap with a button.
A cancer cap should fit more snugly than a cap that goes over the hair and can be made with lighter-weight yarn for comfort.